the Website of Timothy McCabe Follower of Christ; Student of Epistemology, Apologetics, and Theology
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Trinitarianism

Definition

Trinitarianism is the philosophy that there is only one God in terms of essence or being; and that the one God is revealed through three eternally distinct persons, specifically, the Father, the Son (Jesus of Nazareth), and the Holy Spirit. Trinitarianism is unique to Christianity.

Keywords: Trinitarianism, Christianity, God, One, Three, Persons, Father, Son, Holy Spirit.

World Religions and Cults (volume 2)

In Printed Form

Along with numerous other authors including Don Landis, Bodie Hodge and Roger Patterson, Timothy McCabe contributes analyses of various world religions and cults in this volume from Master Books.

Other Writings

"How could Adam and Eve reproduce if neither were married, nor involved in the church to be married? And don't say anything about "God put Eve on earth to love" because the Christians believe that you must be married to have sex."

Eve was created as Adam's wife. In Genesis 2:24-25, speaking of Adam and Eve immediately after the special creation of Eve, we read "For this reason a man shall leave his father and his mother, and be joined to his wife; and they shall become one flesh. And the man and his wife were both naked and were not ashamed.
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"Where is existence going (i.e. eschatology), both immediately and ultimately?"

The Bible states that no one is perfect but God alone (Luke 18:19). As a result, all of us have earned death and condemnation (Romans 6:23). However, in an amazing substitution, God Himself lived the perfect human life in our place, and paid our fine on the cross (2 Corinthians 5:21, Romans 5). Those of us who put our trust in the work He did in our place will be forgiven (Romans 4:5, John 3:18).
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"Do we have free will? Please explain."

Free-will has been defined in several different ways. Some would say that free-will is "the ability to do what we want to do". Under this definition, it's clear that we do have free-will, as all of us (at least on occasion) do what we want. However, another definition of free-will is "the ability to choose, or to choose otherwise". Free-will by this definition has been the subject of debate for centuries. We should note that the issue is not "can we choose?
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