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Open Theism

Definition

Open theism refers to any philosophy which claims that there is a supreme creator of the universe who does not foreknow the outcome of human choices.

Keywords: Open Theism, Philosophies, Philosophy, Rational, Assumption, Contradiction, Reasoning, False, Deductive, Argument From Reason.

Veracity

Open-theistic claims are false .

Proof

Simplified

Humans assume that all contradictions are false. Any worldview that does not allow for this assumption to be rationally justified is deductively false.

Premise 1: If the author of our initial assumptions about time is not also the author of time, our assumptions about time are without reason.

Premise 2: The god of open theism is not the author of time.

Conclusion: Therefore, if the god of open theism is the author of our assumptions about time, our assumptions about time are without reason.

Humans assume that time, like everything else, is non-contradictory. Under open theism, there can ultimately be no reason to hold to this assumption, making it an irrational assumption. This makes open theism deductively false.

In depth

Humans assume that all contradictions are false. Any worldview that does not allow for this assumption to be rationally justified is deductively false.

A. The god of open theism did not design all present conditions.

Premise 1: Anything that does not foreknow all present conditions did not design all present conditions.

Premise 2: The god of open theism does not foreknow all present conditions.

Conclusion: Therefore, the god of open theism did not design all present conditions.

B. The god of open theism is not the rational author of the present.

Premise 1: Anything that did not design all present conditions is not the rational author of the present.

Premise 2: The god of open theism did not design all present conditions (from A above).

Conclusion: Therefore, the god of open theism is not the rational author of the present.

C. The god of open theism is not the rational author of time.

Premise 1: Anyone who is not the rational author of the present is not the rational author of time.

Premise 2: The god of open theism is not the rational author of the present (from B above).

Conclusion: Therefore, the god of open theism is not the rational author of time.

D. If open-theistic claims are true, there is no rational author of time.

Premise 1: If there existed a rational author of time, it would be a god that is not the god of open theism.

Premise 2: If open-theistic claims are true, the only god or gods are open theist gods.

Conclusion: Therefore, if open-theistic claims are true, there is no rational author of time.

E. If open-theistic claims are true, time itself is not capable of rational thought.

Premise 1: If time itself were capable of rational thought, it would be a god other than the god of open theism.

Premise 2: If open-theistic claims are true, the only god or gods are open-theistic.

Conclusion: Therefore, if open-theistic claims are true, time itself is not capable of rational thought.

F. If open-theistic claims are true, no one can be rationally justified in having beliefs about time.

Premise 1: Any being not sovereign over [x] cannot be rationally justified in having beliefs about [x] without the non-contradictory nature of [x] being explicitly predefined by the rational author of [x], or without [x] itself being capable of rational thought.

Premise 2: If open-theistic claims are true, there is no rational author of time and time itself is not capable of rational thought (from D, E above).

Conclusion: Therefore, if open-theistic claims are true, no one can be rationally justified in having beliefs about time.

G. If open-theistic claims are true, humans are not rationally justified in drawing conclusions about things in the future.

Premise 1: If open-theistic claims are true, no one can be rationally justified in having beliefs about time (from F above).

Premise 2: Having beliefs about time is necessary for humans to draw conclusions about things in the future.

Conclusion: Therefore, if open-theistic claims are true, humans are not rationally justified in drawing conclusions about things in the future.

H. If open-theistic claims are true, humans are not rationally justified in drawing conclusions about things in the present.

Premise 1: If open-theistic claims are true, no one can be rationally justified in having beliefs about time (from F above).

Premise 2: Having beliefs about time is necessary for humans to draw conclusions about things in the present.

Conclusion: Therefore, if open-theistic claims are true, humans are not rationally justified in drawing conclusions about things in the present.

I. If open-theistic claims are true, humans are not rationally justified in drawing conclusions about things in the past.

Premise 1: If open-theistic claims are true, no one can be rationally justified in having beliefs about time (from F above).

Premise 2: Having beliefs about time is necessary for humans to draw conclusions about things in the past.

Conclusion: Therefore, if open-theistic claims are true, humans are not rationally justified in drawing conclusions about things in the past.

J. If open-theistic claims are true, no human conclusions are rationally justified.

Premise 1: All human conclusions are about things in the past, present, or future.

Premise 2: If open-theistic claims are true, humans are not rationally justified in drawing conclusions about things in the past, present, or future (from G, H, I above).

Conclusion: Therefore, if open-theistic claims are true, no human conclusions are rationally justified.

Humans assume that time, like everything else, is non-contradictory. Under open theism, there can ultimately be no reason to hold to this assumption, making it an irrational assumption.

This Argument from Reason demonstrates that open theism is deductively false.

World Religions and Cults (volume 2)

In Printed Form

Along with numerous other authors including Don Landis, Bodie Hodge and Roger Patterson, Timothy McCabe contributes analyses of various world religions and cults in this volume from Master Books.

Other Writings

"In Romans 1:23, God clearly says "you have brought down the image of the uncorruptible God to corruptible man". How then can you call Jesus God?"

This question is a continuation of an earlier question, linked to at the bottom of my answer. The question was asked in several parts, so I have compiled all of the questions together here, and will answer them all at once. In full, the questioner asks: "You mentioned that Jesus has two seperate identities. How? Did not Jesus say that he was 'the son of man'?
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"God knowing in advance how I will use my free will means that god knows which events will lead to me being religious, and which to me being atheist. If God does exist, then doesn't his choice to set forth the latter mean he wanted me to be atheist?"

Yes. God has designed each person for His purposes (Romans 9:21). Some people are designed for judgement and others are designed for forgiveness (Romans 9:22-23). All of us are designed to sin (Romans 3:23, 8:28). This magnifies His graciousness; His perfectly just nature; and His eternal Godhood. Whether or not God plans on you remaining an Atheist and ultimately being judged for your willing rejection of obvious and clearly revealed truths, I have no idea (Romans 1:20; Psalm 14:1).
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"Does the "problem of evil" show that an all-good, all-powerful, all-knowing god cannot exist?"

The "problem of evil" generally goes something like this. 1. If God had all-power over our universe, he would have been able to prevent the wickedness of Adolf Hitler. 2. If God had all-knowledge of our universe, he would have known how to prevent the wickedness of Adolf Hitler. 3. If God were all-good, he would have wanted to prevent the wickedness of Adolf Hitler. 4. Adolf Hitler was wicked in our universe. 5.
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