the Website of Timothy McCabe Follower of Christ; Student of Epistemology, Apologetics, and Theology
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Theism

Definition

Theism includes any philosophy which claims that some kind of God or gods exist.

Keywords: Theism, Atheism, Philosophy, True, God, Deductive.

Veracity

Theistic claims are true .

Proof

Either there are no gods, and therefore atheistic claims are true, or there is at least one god, and therefore theistic claims are true.

Premise 1: If atheistic claims are false, then theistic claims are true.

Premise 2: Atheistic claims are false.

Conclusion: Therefore, theistic claims are true.

Since atheistic claims are deductively false, theistic claims are therefore deductively true.

World Religions and Cults (volume 2)

In Printed Form

Along with numerous other authors including Don Landis, Bodie Hodge and Roger Patterson, Timothy McCabe contributes analyses of various world religions and cults in this volume from Master Books.

Other Writings

"Is Buddhism compatible with Christianity?"

Buddhism is incompatible with Christianity. Buddhism rejects the concept of a permanent self, or an immortal soul. In Christianity, the concept of "self" and the immortal soul are pervasively important. In Christianity, it is "self" that sins (Ezekiel 18:4), is resurrected (John 5:29, Romans 8:11), and is eternally judged (Matthew 7:23, Revelation 14:11). It is "self" that is offered eternal forgiveness through Jesus Christ (John 3:16).

"Isn't it the case that, rather than presupposing god as it claims to, the presuppositional view actually presupposes logic and reason?"

Every human presupposes the possibility of coming to rationally justified conclusions. Presuppositionalists recognize this fact. However, any belief ultimately caused without reason is ultimately held to irrationally. Under most worldviews, all human beliefs are ultimately caused without reason. This demonstrates the irrationality of atheism, polytheism, deism, and unitarianism, as well as empiricism.

"If God condemned people to Hell because of free will, yet He wanted to save them, would that mean He isn't capable of saving them?"

If "free will" means that the activities of the human will are not in any way caused by the God who created the humans, then humans do not have free will. The idea of a God who causes people to exist, which people then in turn cause events to occur, and said events are not in any way caused by the aforementioned God, is completely incoherent. I cannot answer the question, because as I understand it, it is meaningless.

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