the Website of Timothy McCabe Follower of Christ; Student of Epistemology, Apologetics, and Theology
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Theism

Definition

Theism includes any philosophy which claims that some kind of God or gods exist.

Keywords: Theism, Atheism, Philosophy, True, God, Deductive.

Veracity

Theistic claims are true .

Proof

Either there are no gods, and therefore atheistic claims are true, or there is at least one god, and therefore theistic claims are true.

Premise 1: If atheistic claims are false, then theistic claims are true.

Premise 2: Atheistic claims are false.

Conclusion: Therefore, theistic claims are true.

Since atheistic claims are deductively false, theistic claims are therefore deductively true.

World Religions and Cults (volume 2)

In Printed Form

Along with numerous other authors including Don Landis, Bodie Hodge and Roger Patterson, Timothy McCabe contributes analyses of various world religions and cults in this volume from Master Books.

Other Writings

"Regarding your answer to Lev 11:13-19... Rather disingenuous of you don't you think? The list is a list of birds (apart from bats) so the writer (god?) meant "birds", not "insects" or "flying things"."

I don't think it was disingenuous in the slightest, but thanks for asking. Here is your argument as I understood it: 1. The 1500 BC Hebrew word "'owph" has to have the exact same meaning as the 21st century English taxonomical classification "Aves". 2. The 1500 BC Hebrew word "'atalleph" has to have the exact same meaning as the 21st century English taxonomical classification "Chiroptera". 3.

"Why does the bible, supposedly the perfect inerrant word of god, claim that bats are birds (Lev 11:13-19)."

Here are the relevant texts in the NASB: Leviticus 11:13-19 These, moreover, you shall detest among the birds; they are abhorrent, not to be eaten: the eagle and the vulture and the buzzard, and the kite and the falcon in its kind, every raven in its kind, and the ostrich and the owl and the sea gull and the hawk in its kind, and the little owl and the cormorant and the great owl, and the white owl and the pelican and the carrion vulture, and the stork, the heron in its kinds, and the hoopoe,...

"You say past time can't be infinite or we would never get to the present. Isn't that just Zeno's Paradox?"

No. Zeno's Paradox takes several forms. I'll just examine one of them -- the one that appears to me to be most pertinent to the question asked. According to Aristotle, "That which is in locomotion must arrive at the half-way stage before it arrives at the goal". Imagine your house is sixty miles from your office. Before you can go sixty miles, you must first go thirty. But before you can go thirty, you must first go fifteen.

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